St. John's Hospital

   
  
 
  
    
  
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  St. John’s Hospital, c. 1941. Source: Santa Monica Public Library.

St. John’s Hospital, c. 1941. Source: Santa Monica Public Library.

In 1920, Los Angeles Archbishop John J. Cantwell believed Santa Monica needed a Catholic hospital, and began to fundraise for St. John’s Hospital (1942, I.E. Loveless; demolished). Cantwell raised support and recruited the Sisters of Charity, a nursing order based in Leavenworth, Kansas, to erect the hospital. Construction began in 1939, and was completed three years later. Named for St. John the Apostle, the six–story, reinforced steel and concrete structure in designed in the late Streamline Moderne-style was located at 1328 22nd Street on a five-acre site. It cost $300,000 and featured horizontal banding and rounded towers on the front façade. The design featured sun decks on all floors and held 80 beds. The original design also provided for the addition of two wings and space was reserved for a Sisters’ and nurses’ home.